Books only about chickens



Title
Autor
Average customer Review
Review/Description
Price in $
cover
Rick / Gail Luttman
Reviewer: Jennifer Welch from Tomball, TX United States
I started my backyard flock with only this book for reference. It's got really good information and is a really fun read - lots of humor mixed in with the great information. If you're thinking about starting a small flock and you're a beginner, this is the book you should buy. It's got great information including a chapter with basic poultry terminology, info on hatching chicks, chicken diseases, raising chickens for eggs or for meat, and a whole lot more. And it's all written in everyday English that even a girl from the city like me can understand. Buy this book!
10.36
cover
J. H. Florea
Reviewer: Jeff M. Chambers from Nebraska
Of the three volumes I purchased when starting my family chicken flock this has been by far the most useful. I highly recommend it for the beginning through intermediate chicken farmer!

6.95
cover
Stephen Green-Armytage
Reviewer: E M Taylor from Kanopolis, KS United States
If you have any interest in beautiful birds of any species, I suspect you will like this book. The photography is of the highest quality and Mr. Green-Armytage has a wonderful way of presenting the birds as special characters, not just standard poses. He has done a wonderful job of selecting a wide variety of lovely chickens from both British and American poultry shows. There is just enough text to whet one's interest in the breeds. Unfortunately, the index only has page numbers for the photos. Descriptions of the birds need to be hunted up on your own. But you bought it for the photos of lovely, strange and cute/funny birds.
17.46
cover
Tamara Staples / Christa Velbel
Book Description
Chickens are bewitching birds: lush plumage, gleaming feathers, perfect thighs. But few meet the standard of perfection of the American poultry show, the beauty pageant of the barnyard and the true test of poultry pulchritude. In The Fairest Fowl, photographer Tamara Staples celebrates the champions of the chicken world at their best. Dozens of stunning portraits capture the quirky personality and undeniable grace of these noble birds as you've never seen them before. Location photography of the shows, details of the judging process, strategies from poultry farmers, and profiles of each prize breed set the scene and offer insight for the discerning chicken aficionado. And an appreciation of Staples' photography by public radio's Ira Glass of This American Life explores the finer points of chicken portraiture. Finally, chickens receive the respect they're due.
11.96
cover
Page Smith / Charles Daniel
Reviewer: kevin jones from Fair Oaks, CA USA
I live in a small, um, somewhat rustic village not far from Sacramento, California. In the sixties, there came to the town, so the local lore goes, artisans, who tended to live somewhat communally. They ultimately brought chickens to live with them, also communally. When the sixties were over, and the artisans moved on to state jobs and law school, the chickens remained. And were fruitful. And multiplied. And multiply still, as well as serving as mobile speed bumps, tourist attractions, points of political controversy (Chased and attacked chickens, particularly adults, especially roosters, have been known to retaliate in kind, to people who treat them fowlly: actions are afoot to collect ((nap?)) the current chickens and replace them with non-aggressive breeds ((Hey, it's California, after all))),and t-shirt and advertising icons. All in all, it's an idyllic little place that resembles nothing so much as say, the set for Murder She Wrote, if you happened to toss in some palm trees and some chickens along with the pines in the town square. Think Norman Rockwell. Think Norman Rockwell on nitrous oxide. It's a place where nobody sleeps very late, where nobody really has to go hungry, and where approximately every other resident is a chicken.

But I've lived there for a while, so I know these things. Paige Smith's book was out of print for a long while (But now thanks to U of Georgia P, the folks who brought back William Hedgepeth's The Hog Book--there's a pattern here), but now you can read and know these things as well.

The chickens will be grateful.
11.96
cover
Helga Fritzsche
Reviewer: A reader from West Yorkshire, England
I thought that this was a very good introduction to keeping chickens of all sizes, and is written in nice clear terms. The book is well-illustrated, and gives a 'lowdown' on many breeds of bantam, along with very helpful advice on housing and care of your flock. I particularly liked the way the author tries to give an insight on behaviour, and how chickens 'tick'. I'm very pleased I bought this book!
6.95
cover
Gail Damerow
Reviewer: Shelley from West Michigan
My very first chickens are 2 months old now, and I've referred back to this book countless times, for help with making brooder boxes, when to remove the heat lamp, buying feeders/waterers, making our coop, treating diarrhea, when to switch feeds, how to tell a cockerel from a pullet (!), to find out if panting in 90-degree weather is normal (it is), etc., etc. It may be written for kids, but it is not condescending. I appreciate the practical and have-fun approach. I just read about the different chicken sounds, and learned that the cool sound my hens make when they're happy is called "singing." Get the book!
11.96
cover
Karen Davis
Many Americans have made the choice to eat less red meat. For some, it is simply a health decision; others are choosing to become vegetarians for ethical reasons. Another factor is that books such as Jeremy Rifkin's Beyond Beef (1992) have exposed unsanitary processing conditions and alerted readers to the environmental consequences of raising and maintaining large cattle herds. Davis now targets those who eat chicken, turkey, or eggs with her scathing indictment of the poultry industry. She is president of United Poultry Concerns, an animal rights and animal welfare advocacy group, and she has previously written a vegetarian cookbook, Instead of Chicken, Instead of Turkey (1993), featuring "alternatives to traditional poultry and egg recipes." Upbraiding those who breed and raise poultry, Davis documents the inhumane conditions of factory farming, explicitly detailing the lives and deaths of battery hens raised in tiered brooding trays and of broiler chickens. She also charges that so-called free-range chickens fare no better. Bolstered by unyielding conviction, Davis argues her case with passion. David Rouse
10.36
cover
Gail Damerow
Reviewer: David Leach from Upstate New York
I bought this book originally several years ago. I have found it to be the most informative of any of my poultry books. I have used it to help friends new to poultry and it answered all of their questions. The most recent purchase was a gift for another "newbie." I'm sure that she will find it very helpful. If you are thinking about a home flock, small or large, this book is a must.
13.26
cover
Gail Damerow / Amanda Haar
The editor of Rural Heritage has written a first-rate guide for the small producer interested in healthful meat and eggs as well as the exotic breed fancier raising birds for show. Having published a number of general guides to backyard poultry, including one for children, Damerow here concentrates on everything that can go wrong: diseases; problems associated with keeping birds in close quarters or caging them; litter; cannibalism; vitamin deficiency, resulting in poor molting; incubators that are too hot or too cold; predators; and the invasions of rats. She stresses that the best preventative measures involve protecting one's flock against outside influences (such as wild birds or other chickens), careful culling, and balanced nutrition. Damerow is a good writer, carefully walking the line between insulting the reader's intelligence, a flaw with many books of this sort, and giving more technical information than growers need. Her discussion of how one keeps straight which chick came from which mating--which involves the injection of food dyes into fertilized eggs, and carefully marking the webbings of feet--is downright ingenious. Flawless.
13.96
cover
Jan Brett
Reviewer: Roz Levine (see more about me) from Virginia
Poor Henny, all she really wants is to be a mother hen and have a bunch of baby chicks, just like her friend Goosey-Goosey. But that is not to be. For every morning, the Tomten comes and takes her newly laid egg for his breakfast. Enter Hedgie, the hedgehog with a clever idea and a few tricks up his proverbial sleeve. Early each morning, before the rooster crows and wakes the Tomten up, Hedgie takes Henny's egg and substitutes something else for it...first an acorn, then a strawberry, a mushroom and then a potato. And each day, the Tomten is left hungry. He becomes so angry that he threatens to eat Henny if she does not leave him an egg for breakfast the next day. Henny is scared and frantic, but Hedgie still has one last surprise left for that mean Tomten and an even bigger surprise for Henny.....Jan Brett, has written a simple, witty Scandinavian folk tale, starring her wonderful and always endearing, Hedgie. Her text is only outdone by her detailed, expressive artwork, complete with signature needlepoint border and clues, stiched in, of what's to come. Young children will be entranced as they listen to this humorous tale while following the illustrations and guessing at the story plot. Hedgie's Surprise makes a terrific gift and is a great addition to all home libraries
6.95
cover
Will Graves
Reviewer: cluckachicken from Cle Elum, Washington United States
My four Rhode Island Reds are my first ever to care for and this book helped me to quickly know what to do without having to take a college course. It is helpful in building of and requirements of a coop, requirements for the growing chick into adulthood (food, lighting, temperature, water, protection and cleanliness.)I highly recommend this book and also bought one for a christmas present for an owner of a small flock.Plus there is much more information like, illness& diseases, butchering, ducks, turkeys, and incubation.

9.95

Search:
Keywords:
In Association with Amazon.com



General Remarks ] [ Keeping ] [ Races ] [ Galeries ] [ FAQ ] [ Service ] [ Book-Shop ] [ Partners ] [ InteractionContact]

© 2001-2002 Lukas Kiefer, Schönau Last Update: 30/11/01